Tim Riswick

Author: Tim Riswick

RICH Early Career Development Grant

In order to support our researchers in the early stages of their career, the Radboud Institute for Culture and History (RICH) offers assistant professors (UDs) who obtained their PhD less than 3 years ago the possibility to apply for short-term course releases in order to make time to develop a research line, write a grant

New article published: ‘Exploring the mortality advantage of Jewish neighbourhoods in mid-19th century Amsterdam’

Today the article (written together with Sanne Muurling and Katalin Buzasi) ‘Exploring the mortality advantages and disadvantages of Jewish neighborhoods in nineteenth century Amsterdam’ is published in Demographic Research as a Descriptive Finding. Click here for the open access article.

Assistant Professor of Historical Demography

Extremely happy that today I officially start as Assistant Professor of Historical Demography (on a permanent contract) at Radboud University. Very grateful for this opportunity and to everyone who supported me along the way!

New article published: ‘Causes of child adoption in Taiwan, 1906-1945’

Today the third chapter of my dissertation (written together by Xingchen ChiaChi Lin) was published online as part of a special issue of Annales de démographie historique on the history of adoption: ‘Causes of child adoption in Taiwan, 1906-1945. The importance of gender, household composition and variation over time and place’. You can find it

ESHD Conference 2022 in Madrid

From 2-5 March the European Society for Historical Demography Conference 2022 in Madrid took place. It was a great conferences: very interesting presentations, constructive discussions, and incredibly nice and friendly people! I was active in the following sessions: Chair ‘Academic Publishing: Meet the Editors’. Chair ‘Facing infectious disease and epidemics’ Commentator ‘How conditions in early

Young Demographers Conference 2022 in Prague

From 1-4 February 2022 the Young Demographers Conference took place, which was co-organized with the Association for Young Historical Demographers. It was a very nice conference, in particular the location of the poster session was awesome, just like all the participants. I had the pleasure to chair the session on Historical Demography and present a

Book review published

My book review of ‘Evan N. Dawley, Becoming Taiwanese: Ethnogenesis in a Colonial City, 1880s to 1950s‘ is published in the journal of International Journal of Taiwan Studies.

New (Dutch) project website launced

Are you curious about the diseases that plagued Amsterdam in the nineteenth and twentieth century? Do you want to know why mortality has decreased so drastically during the last two centuries? Then surf to www.doodinamsterdam.nl now. ‘Dood in Amsterdam’ (Death in Amsterdam) is our new website, set up by my colleagues and myself. On this website,

Presentation at European Association for the History of Medicine and Health

On Thursday 9 September a number of research results from our project team were presented at the conference of the European Association for the History of Medicine and Health. In the first session, Sanne Muurling from our research group presented follow-up research that she did together with Katalin Buzasi and myself into the latest national

History Workshop Online blog post about Smallpox and Social inequalities in Amsterdam (1870-1872)

Sanne Muurling, Katalin Buzasi and myself published a blog post on History Workshop Online about the smallpox epidemic in Amsterdam (1870-1872). Smallpox was the first contagious disease for which a vaccine was invented, yet the history of this final epidemic over 70 years later provides important lessons about how social inequalities continue to shape vulnerability to disease in